WEIRDLAND: How to build Emotional Muscle (Kerry Kelly)

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

How to build Emotional Muscle (Kerry Kelly)

"An American in Paris" is best known for its wordless 17 minute ballet sequence at the end, the most visually striking in the film.

In another number, the romantic courtship dance to “Our Love is Here to Stay”, Jerry Mulligan (Gene Kelly) is attempting to woo the resistant Lise (Leslie Caron), who leans shyly against a wall. When the violins start, Jerry pulls Lise into a gentle embrace, and the two begin a balletic exchange that is at once sinuous and chaste.

Gene Kelly as Jerry is fleet-footed, graceful, athletic, and undeniably masculine. No matter how many grand jet├ęs he executes, you never for a moment forget he’s a guy (muscular and passionate).

Gene Kelly representing Toulouse-Lautrec's Chocolate Dancing in Achille’s Bar painting

"Emotional Muscle: Strong Parents, Strong Children" by PHD Kerry Kelly Novick & Jack Novick (2010). Kerry Kelly Novick (Gene Kelly's daughter) received degrees in Comparative Literature from the University of California at Berkeley and Psychology from University College, London. Kerry and her husband Jack Novick, PhD, have been working with children and families on thoughtful, positive parenting techniques for more than four decades. Psychoanalysts and psychologists, they are the founders of the innovative Allen Creek Preschool in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

"All parents want their children to have healthy bodies with strong physical muscles. They also want their children to grow up to be successful, kind, responsible, creative, and good. 'Emotional Muscle' provides parenting tips for the first five years of your child’s life, offering opportunities for emotional muscle-building at every stage". Source: www.buildemotionalmuscle.com

Gene Kelly bottle feeding his daughter Kerry (1942)

Gene Kelly's first two wives were dancers. Actress Betsy Blair met Gene in the "Diamond Horseshoe" (Billy Rose's nightclub) where he was a choreographer and she was a chorus dancer.

Carol Haney, Gene Kelly, and Jeanne Coyne Rehearsals for "Singin' in the Rain" (1952)

Gene Kelly's second wife Jeanne Coyne had worked as his dancing assistant for many years before they married in 1960. A major talent in her own right, her dazzling footwork can be seen in the "From This Moment On" number alongside partner Bobby Van, Ann Miller, Tommy Rall, Carol Haney and Bob Fosse in "Kiss Me, Kate" (1953).

Gene Kelly and Tamara Toumanova in "Invitation to the Dance" (1956) directed by Gene Kelly

Ballet routine traditionally starts with barre exercises, corner travelling work, centre exercises which tests the students stability without the barre for support. Tap dance focuses on percussive rhythm and precise patterns of sound. It is a rhythmic dance (with syncopation and improvisation) that helps build muscle control, and it's performed with shoes that have metal taps underneath. It's important to know how to build muscle while practising dance and training in its varieties of tap, ballet, jazz, etc.

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